Day wins from the front again

Day wins from the front again

Not A Bad Oul Day (David Simmonson) beats Fairy Flute ©Healy Racing Photos By Alan Magee Not A Bad Oul Day recorded his third win this season and brought his career tally to five when adopting customary front-running tactics in the Limerick Handicap. David Simmonson made virtually all on the admirable five-year-old gelding, who kept on well in the straight to land odds of 9/2 in this mile event. The third reserve Fairy Flute had just one rival behind her two furlongs out but flew home on the outside inside the final furlong to get within half a length. The Lords Walk was a further two and three quarter lengths away in third. There was plenty of interference in behind with Teo’s Music (fourth) and Happy Company (seventh) among those that suffered. Winning trainer Johnny Feane said, “I was a bit worried about the ground but he had won on quick ground at Ayr, so I chanced him. “The handicapper is close to having a hold of him but David’s 7lbs claim was a big help. We’ll aim for Galway now.” (TW & AM)
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Beg denies odds-on Guesswork in the bumper

Scotch Beg and Helen Mooney lead home Its All Guesswork and Lisa O’Neill ©Healy Racing Photos By Donal Murphy The Andy Oliver trained Scotch Beg denied Gordon Elliott a four-timer, as she took the last at Downpatrick, the Molson Coors (Ladies Pro/Am) Flat Race. Beaten a long way into fifth on her last start at Clonmel, the daughter of Presenting was sent off at 10/1 under Helen Mooney. Settled in second she got to the front over two furlongs out, and battled on gamely under pressure from there to see off the favourite by half a length. The runner-up, who was ridden by Lisa O’Neill, wasn’t helped by the winner who drifted left in the closing stages. Andrew Oliver said afterwards: “That’s the first time I’ve met Helen (Mooney) but she gave her a super ride. She was spot on where she was supposed to be. “She ran well at Clonmel and didn’t really find. Apparently there was a lot of rain which I would say maybe deadened her pace. She likes the good ground and travelled sweet as a nut (today). It was a good run-in, I thought anything could happen on the run-in. “Downpatrick has been very lucky for me. I haven’t had that many National Hunt horses over the last year or two. We have won bumpers here. The last bumper horse I had won here about three years ago. “She has had a tough campaign. We were going to leave her off for the autumn but you never know, the plans could change. She might have hit a sweet spot. “She is a very honest mare owned by people (Bill MacKenzie and family) who have been great supporters of mine this year or so with this mare. It means an awful lot to them so I’m delighted.” The winner is a half-sister to Hello George, who recorded his fourth career success on his last start at Newbury in March. Additional reporting by Michael Graham
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Bid battles for another ‘surprise’ big-race win

Hit The Bid and Leigh Roche ©Healy Racing Photos The Darren Bunyan trained Hit The Bid caused the second big-race ’surprise’ win of his career when landing the Midsummer Sprint Stakes at Cork today, under regular jockey Leigh Roche, at odds of 20/1. The son of Exceed And Excel won a Group 3 Curragh juvenile sprint last August at 50/1 but since finished in rear on each of his next three starts. Today he raced with the pace and in the end scored a three parts of a length win over Go Kart. Afterwards Bunyan quipped “everybody keeps mentioning about him being a surprise 50/1 winner of a Group 3 last year but everybody forgets he was 100/1 that morning – we weren’t surprised!” He added “it’s nice to see him get his head back in front and things haven’t worked out for him in his last couple of runs. He came back from France very fresh and well and we said we’d give him a shot at this and Leigh (Roche) again was magic on him today. “He loves to rattle off the top of the ground but is a horse you can’t delay with, and at France the last day he boiled over. Another horse pulled a shoe off at the start and there was a 25 minute hold-up, which was a disgrace to be honest, but it’s a different country with different ways of doing things and we have to work by that. “We’ll step him back up to a Group 3 or 2 now but there’s no programme for those horses in Ireland so he’ll have his suitcases packed again shortly. I think he’s definitely a Group 2 horse when things go right for him.” By Tom Weekes
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